Plavix

Plavix (clopidogrel bisulfate) was approved by the FDA as a blood thinner designed to prevent blood clots in 1997. Plavix, which is made by, Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. and Sanofi Aventis, is one of the most highly prescribed drugs on the market.

While Plavix is prescribed to prevent strokes and heart attacks, recent studies have shown Plavix use may actually increase the risk of these events occurring. The FDA has also stated many people may have a genetic factor that can reduce or invalidate the active ingredients thus preventing the medicine from having any affect on reduction of blood clots. Furthermore, the FDA has warned that the combination of Plavix and proton-pump inhibitors such as Nexium or Prilosec can affect the ability of Plavix to act properly as a blood thinner.

A number of Plavix lawsuits have been filed against Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. and Sanofi Aventis alleging that the drug maker knew of these risks and contraindications and failed to adequately research their medication or warn users about the risk associated with its use. Furthermore the claims suggests that the manufacturers were aware about the serious health complications that could arise from the use of Plavix and did not stop advertising it as safe and more effective than the taking aspirin alone nor did they inform the public of these risks.

The attorneys at Hollis Wright are currently investigating claims involving person who have experienced strokes, gastrointestinal bleeding, cerebral bleeding, heart attacks, a rare but potentially fatal condition called Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (TTP), and other serious conditions, including death while taking Plavix.